Learning about the history of civilization one recipe at a time

As a self-directed and unschooling educator, it is so exciting to me when I witness others sinking into their curiosities and passions as legitimate ways of getting to know and explore the world around them. Well, now is the moment to acknowledge my own joy in following a self-directed learning path myself, and in doing so also sharing my awareness of the importance of modelling self-directed education in transparent ways. If you want the little and growing people around you to develop the skills, abilities, and confidence to be a self-directed learner in the world, model it!  Your desire for the growing people you love to have it all is a call to arms, you also get to do this! In fact, you must.  For me, the roots of my curiosity always bring me back to food, collaborative food making, and community building because of food. So when I saw this book that promised to give me an opportunity to explore world history through recipes…I was excited.

Recipe history is a way to get curious about so much more. Following human civilization from 1958 BCE to 2011, “A History of Food In 100 Recipes”, is an exploration of how human patterns, tastes, techniques, and products have evolved. I’m learning about the earliest known recipes found on tablets in Mesopotamia in 1700 BCE through many years and developments that landed Amelia Simmons in the United States in 1796,  perfecting and publishing her recipe for apple pie… and the adventure continues to explore the first t.v dinners and their significance and beyond!

americancookery31
American Cookery, or the art of dressing viands, fish, poultry, and vegetables, and the best modes of making pastes, puffs, pies, tarts, puddings, custards, and preserves, and all kinds of cakes, from the imperial plum to plain cake: Adapted to this country, and all grades of life.
This book is significant not only because of the epically long title but  because it is the first cookbook published in the 13 states upon its publication in 1796. Of course, it featured the modern version of apple pie

I am not planning on becoming a food historian. But through exploring the corners and folds of my curiosity, I keep getting to know the world around me with greater depth and context. Where it will all lead is not known and planned out, but I am sure excited about my learning right now!

I get to learn so much by following my curiosity about food, making food, eating food. What are you curious about?

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